CGI Graphics: Redefining a Picture-Perfect World in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy

CGI Graphics: Redefining a Picture-Perfect World in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy

CGI Graphics in Modern Cinema

CGI Graphics: Redefining a Picture-Perfect World in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy
CGI graphics or Computer-generated imagery is the application of the field of computer graphics to special effects. CGI graphics is used in films, television programs and commercials, and in printed media. Video games most often use real-time computer graphics but may also include pre-rendered “cut scenes” and intro movies that would be typical CGI graphics applications.
CGI graphics is used for visual effects because the quality is often higher and effects are more controllable than other more physically based processes, such as constructing miniatures for effects shots or hiring extras for crowd scenes, and because it allows the creation of images that would not be feasible using any other technology.
It can also allow a single artist to produce content without the use of actors, expensive set pieces, or props. Recent accessibility of CGI graphics software and increased computer speeds has allowed individual artists and small companies to produce professional grade films, games, and fine art from their home computers.
The evolution of this field of graphic design didn’t happen over a very long, extended period ? but instead over a couple of decades. In fact, the rapid advancement of computer processing power is primarily what served as a catalyst for the explosion of CGI graphics animation. The concept of today’s level of 3D CGI graphics animation is an evolution from basic cartoon animation into a simulated world that seeks to represent realism as accurately as possible. It does this by slicing up the world into the smallest segments possible, and then controlling how those tiny parts of real world objects move, react and change based on the other objects and conditions within that 3D world.
In recent years, the use of computer-generated imagery has been made in courtrooms. They are used to help judges or the jury to better visualize the sequence of events, evidence or hypothesis. But a 1997 study showed that people are poor intuitive physicists and easily influenced by computer generated images. Thus it is important that jurors and other legal decision-makers be made aware that such exhibits are merely a representation of one potential sequence of events.

Webmaster?fs bookmarks and reference sites